Stories

Sonrisas descubiertas para madre e hija en Misión Internacional de septiembre

Del 07 al 13 de septiembre de 2019, Operación Sonrisa Nicaragua está desarrollando la segunda Misión Internacional de este año, en ella pretenden beneficiar a 129 pacientes para mejorar su calidad de vida y descubrirles esa hermosa sonrisa que tanto anhelan, entre las personas beneficiadas están Sofía López y Johana Mendoza López, madre e hija que se trasladaron desde Rosita, municipio de la Región Autónoma del Caribe Norte de Nicaragua que está a 480 kilómetros de la capital.

Sofía refirió que decidieron emprender el viaje, luego que ejecutivos de la empresa Calibre, les contara sobre la digna labor de Operación Sonrisa Nicaragua, gestionara su transporte y realizara las diligencias pertinentes. Hace diez años Sofía ya había recibido su primera intervención de labio, quedó muy contenta de la atención que recibió y de como la trataron en el hospital.

En esta jornada Sofía, quien se dedica a labores del campo recibió exitosamente su segunda operación (cirugía de paladar) e igualmente su pequeña bebé de un año recibió su primera cirugía de labio primario, dijo que aunque estaba nerviosa siempre confió en las manos que las iban a atender. “Nosotros sabemos que las personas que están involucradas en el proceso son capaces”, indicó.

Los obstáculos que tuvieron que atravesar son muchos, uno en particular fue que caminaron seis horas para salir de su comunidad para abordar el transporte que los llevaría a tan ansiadas cirugías. Su esposo Olgemar Mendoza comentó que, pese a las adversidades, sobre todo económicas se logró el objetivo, agradeció tanto a Calibre y Operación Sonrisa Nicaragua por el sueño cumplido, “sin ese apoyo ellas no se hubiesen hecho las operaciones (esposa e hija) porque somos pobres y sin posibilidades de costearlas. Estoy muy contento por eso”, finalizó.

Operación Sonrisa Nicaragua realizó la segunda Misión Internacional del año, que dio inicio el sábado 7 y culminó el viernes de 13 de septiembre, se lograron evaluaron 180 pacientes y se beneficiaron a 122 pacientes con cirugías de fisura labial y paladar hendido.

Entre las personas beneficiadas están Sofía López de 20 años y Johana Mendoza López de 6 meses, madre e hija que se trasladaron desde Rosita, que está a 480 kilómetros de la capital; ambas fueron operadas durante esta Misión Internacional.

This Radio Program Is Saving Lives

Editor’s note: Since Operation Smile’s founding in 1982, delivering safe surgery to people living with cleft conditions in low-resource settings around the world has been – and will continue to be – its driving force. 

But as the organization expanded into more and more places of dire need, it has been met by the devastating effects of hospitals operating with inadequate infrastructure and equipment. 

Fueled by the foundational belief that everyone in need of surgery deserves exceptional care, Operation Smile is applying its expertise in treating cleft conditions to create sustainable solutions that will bring safe and essential surgery to people where it’s needed most.

In rural northeastern Nicaragua, this life-saving work is already underway through a pilot project called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.” For deeper context on the problems that this initiative is addressing, follow this link to watch the video and read more.

Throughout many homes in the rural town of Bonanza, Nicaragua, radio speakers erupt with the sound of a woman’s voice.

And people are listening.

By reaching out into the community, Dr. Brenda Tinoco is helping knock down the physical and economic barriers that prevent people from traveling to the hospital.

Single mothers like Rosa Emilia are learning about cervical cancer. Working men like Javier are being educated on how to stay healthy. And so many others are feeling supported, knowing that they will have access to surgery and health care when they need it.

“What we want to achieve with the radio program is to relieve the community’s fears,” Brenda said. “So that they know more and can identify warning signs in time and make the decision to go to the hospital to seek help.”

Drs. Brenda Tinoco and Alvaro Martinez use the radio program to inform the community. Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

As a general physician and site coordinator, Brenda is providing knowledge of treatment opportunities through a pilot project called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.” With support from the UBS Optimus Foundation, Operation Smile and Nicaragua’s Ministry of Health are working together at the two primary hospitals in Siuna and Bonanza. By joining forces, Operation Smile and the Ministry of Health seek to improve the surgical infrastructure of the hospitals and to spread awareness about surgically treatable conditions to the people of the region.

Before the radio program, an overwhelming hurdle for patients and their families was lack of knowledge about the cause of their symptoms which inhibited many people from receiving crucial care at the right time.

“Sometimes they think that they have been cursed, so coming to the hospital won’t help,” Brenda said. “Others are scared to have surgery, mainly because of the anesthesia.”

Javier listens to the radio as he mines for gold. Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

Men, women and children were dying from treatable illnesses because they were not being informed. But through education and awareness efforts, more patients are being treated and more lives are being saved. Yet, even when people recognize the need to pursue medical care, they are being confronted with the cost and hardship of traveling to a hospital while leaving their families behind.

“There are many barriers in our community that keep people from coming to the hospital in time. One of those is distance,” Brenda said. “There are communities where it can take up to two days to reach the hospital.”

With this project’s location, nothing stood in Danisa’s way when her son needed surgery for his umbilical hernia. For her, having this project close to home saved her son’s life.

“There are some people who don’t have money to go to Managua,” Danisa said. “And some children die, so it is important for the benefit of all to have this project here.”

Surgery for the People is a reason why people like Danisa, Rosa Emilia and Javier can trust that they will receive the safe and effective care to which they’ve never had access before.

Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

This Man Turns “Junk” Into Lifesaving Equipment

Editor’s note: Since Operation Smile’s founding in 1982, delivering safe surgery to people living with cleft conditions in low-resource settings around the world has been – and will continue to be – its driving force.

But as the organization expanded into more and more places of dire need, it has been met by the devastating effects of hospitals operating with inadequate infrastructure and equipment.

Fueled by the foundational belief that everyone in need of surgery deserves exceptional care, Operation Smile is applying its expertise in treating cleft conditions to create sustainable solutions that will bring safe and essential surgery to people where it’s needed most.

In rural northeastern Nicaragua, this life-saving work is already underway through a pilot project called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.” For deeper context on the problems that this initiative is addressing, follow this link to watch the video and read more. 

Henry Parrales opens the metal gate that leads to a small plot of land behind the primary hospital in Bonanza, Nicaragua.

Just around the side of the building lies twisted piles of what appears to be garbage at first glance.

A closer look reveals that it’s anything but trash.

“Before I started here, they just said, ‘This equipment doesn’t work,’ and the health workers threw it away,” Henry says as he surveys the tangled masses of discarded medical equipment.

Exposed to the harsh Nicaraguan elements, these devices’ days are numbered. But today, Henry is making sure that no more pieces of critically needed medical equipment suffer the same fate.

As a biomedical technician, Henry is part of a project called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.” Supported by the UBS Optimus Foundation, the private/public partnership between Operation Smile and Nicaragua’s Ministry of Health is improving the surgical infrastructure of two primary hospitals and spreading awareness about surgically treatable conditions to the people of Nicaragua’s remote and impoverished northeastern region.

Henry’s role in the project is to perform maintenance on medical equipment and ensure that each machine is functioning properly.

Between March and September 2018, Surgery for the People’s biomedical team repaired more than 200 pieces of medical equipment, saving more than $316,000.*

For many patients in this area of the country, their survival may depend on the equipment that he repairs.

In the hospital’s workshop, Henry lends his masterful touch to a piece of equipment that would have likely ended up in the pile behind the building before he began working on the project.

“What I am fixing now is a nebulizer, which is used to relieve children’s breathing difficulties,” Henry says. “We use this daily, especially in emergencies, since the climate here is varied and breathing difficulties are common.”

Every day, Henry applies his knowledge and skill to ensure that the hospitals are the safest possible places for their patients.

He monitors and repairs crucial equipment like defibrillators, which are used to save lives during cardiac arrest. By prioritizing neonatal equipment, Henry ensures that the hospitals’ youngest patients receive the care that they deserve.

“Also, I check the operating theater and the emergency room so that surgery can be safe,” says Henry. “It is my job to check that all of the equipment works perfectly.”

And thanks to Henry, the “junk” that would once be tossed aside is now being turned into equipment that will function as designed: to help save lives.

“I am very happy with my work,” Henry said. “There is less waste and the money can be used to buy medicines and improve other areas.”

* These figures were derived from field reporting and are dynamic and subject to change.

This Selfless Mother Finally Receives Lifesaving Surgery

Editor’s note: Since Operation Smile’s founding in 1982, delivering safe surgery to people living with cleft conditions in low-resource settings around the world has been – and will continue to be – its driving force.

But as the organization expanded into more and more places of dire need, it has been met by the devastating effects of hospitals operating with inadequate infrastructure and equipment.

Fueled by the foundational belief that everyone in need of surgery deserves exceptional care, Operation Smile is applying its expertise in treating cleft conditions to create sustainable solutions that will bring safe and essential surgery to people where it’s needed most.

In rural northeastern Nicaragua, this life-saving work is already underway through a pilot project called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.” For deeper context on the problems that this initiative is addressing, follow this link to watch the video and read more.

Surrounded by her family, Nicolasa is wheeled toward the operating room.

After passing through the door, she stands and takes a brave step toward living a life free of pain.

Enduring years of immense discomfort from a large kidney stone and its resulting complications caused Nicolasa to lose much of her strength. But listening to her talk about the dedication she has for her family proves that she is anything but weak.

Nicolasa poses with members of her family. Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

“They told me that I won’t have any wounds, that it is done using a laser,” Nicolasa says about her impending surgery. “And that it will make my recovery faster so I can look after my son.”

She refused to give up after a tragic accident left her son paralyzed from the neck down many years ago. Even as she dealt with the unbearable pain, she continued to make sacrifices in order to care for him.

Unfortunately, not being able to leave Suina to receive surgery was one of the sacrifices.

Leaving her son behind was never an option for Nicolasa, and surgery remained out of reach – until now.

Today, Nicolasa and so many other patients like her who suffer from treatable illnesses can access the care that they need and deserve. With support from the UBS Optimus Foundation, Operation Smile and Nicaragua’s Ministry of Health are working together on a pilot project at the two primary hospitals in Siuna and Bonanza called Cirurgía para el Pueblo – “Surgery for the People.”By joining forces, Operation Smile and the Ministry of Health seek to improve the surgical infrastructure of the hospitals and to spread awareness about surgically treatable conditions to the people of the region.

Urological surgeon Dr. Augustin Mendoza. Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

With a new laser technique, urological surgeon Dr. Augustin Mendoza operates using equipment that allows patients like Nicolasa to undergo surgery without invasive measures or painful recoveries. And because of its location, the project makes this care and technology accessible for more people who need it close to home.

“Surgery for the People improves access to health care to people who, for many years, didn’t have this access,” Dr. Mendoza said. “Surgery for the People is opening possibilities to people from the most remote areas, providing surgery that is safe and of high quality.”

Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.

As Nicolasa rests in the hospital’s recovery area, she grasps Dr. Mendoza’s hand.

“Thank you,” she says to him. “May God light your way.”

The day after her surgery, Nicolasa is ready to leave the hospital, return to her son and put 20 years of pain behind her.

Nicolasa and Dr. Mendoza after surgery. Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt.